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The Villas For Sale at Grand Isle Resort

DIVING IN THE BAHAMAS: BLUE HOLES, UNDERWATER CAVES AND MORE

The Bahamas are known for white sandy beaches, pristine waters, perfect temperatures and a relaxing vibe more so than anywhere else in the world.

As an archipelagic nation, the Bahamas is famous for its excellent diving sites. If you’re looking for a bit of adventure, breathtaking blue holes and long-lost shipwrecks await you under the ocean blue, all in the company of PADI-certified instructors.

With over 350 small islands and cays, Exuma has plenty of undiscovered waters and wonderful dive opportunities not far from your luxury villa at Grand Isle Resort & Spa.

If, like most people, you are not comfortable heading out on your own, give Dive Exuma a try – this company offers all manner of tours in and around region.

TOP DIVING SPOTS TO REACH WHILE IN GREAT EXUMA, BAHAMAS

If you are in the mood for a diving adventure close to your Grand Isle villa, plenty of options are right here on Great Exuma:

  • Angelfish Blue Hole – This hot spot is located in an enclosed bay off Stocking Island and reaches a maximum depth of 92 feet. On this dive, you’ll often see hose-eye jacks and humpheaded parrotfish. The bay is also populated with eagle rays and turtles.
  • Crab Cay Crevasse – You can find this gem just south of George Town. It is found in a semi-circular depression with a vertical drop on each side. What makes the cave unique is there are three difference entrances, with a maximum diving depth of 100 feet.
  • Mystery Cave – Not far from the Angelfish Blue Hole, this system runs right under Stocking Island and eventually links up with an inland blue hole. You’ll find plenty of grunts, Atlantic spadefish and snappers here. Maximum diving depth is 80 feet. 

BLUE HOLES AND UNDERWATER CAVES YOU CAN FIND IN GREAT EXUMA

Diving solo is never recommended for safety reasons, so booking a dive package to see some of the incredible blue holes makes good sense. Locals know the exact location of these underwater caves, which disappear down deep underwater chimneys and appear to have darker blue water.

The tidal blue holes in the Bahamas were probably formed when the sea levels were lower, during the previous Ice Age. Some blue holes are connected to inland sinkholes where water has eroded the limestone or coral.

You might also consider visiting Andros, the largest island in the Bahamas. This “sleeping giant”, as it is often called, is home to some of the largest blue holes in the world.

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